From Page One to Your Office Wall

By Salgado, Robert | Editor & Publisher, August 21, 1999 | Go to article overview

From Page One to Your Office Wall


Salgado, Robert, Editor & Publisher


Taking advantage of the Web and digital photo archives, newspapers are selling their wares

Newspapers are looking at their photo files differently these days. Not only do they have to adjust to digital rather than negative files, but also to different ways of fulfilling the requests of their readers. Many newspapers are looking to market the pictures that once languished in the libraries awaiting an anniversary or a related news event to justify republication.

Photographers are also discovering that their pictures long-forgotten have a new life, often without their approval or benefit, since the copyrights belong to the employer, with the exception of some free- lancers who have not signed away their rights.

The conflict between photographers and newspapers is analogous to an ordeal the movie industry went through beginning in 1948 when the Screen Actors Guild realized that movies made for theatrical release under the studio system were appearing on tv. That issue didn't get resolved until 1960 when a five-week strike led by Ronald Reagan, then guild president, led to contract terms that included residual payments for actors for movies made after 1960.

In 1999, the National Press Photographers Association, which in the past avoided the rights issue, changed its bylaws to allow its officers to comment on what had previously been considered a labor-relations issue outside its purview.

That is not to say that all newspaper photographers are ready to demand a piece of the subsidiary sales pie. John Long, a Hartford Courant photographer and active nppa member, says. "I traded my rights for a full-TIMe job , and I'm not sorry. I'm a lousy businessman, For me, it worked out fine." But it is an issue that may come to a head soon.

Even without the aggressive marketing of other image owners on the Web, newspapers have seen a new demand for their file pictures and have instituted new methods for dealing with the volume.

Lupe Salazar, rights and permission manager for the Los Angeles TIMes, says, "Sales [in her department] have increased tremendously in the past few years."

The TIMes has a "rights and permissions" hotline with a menu that includes an option for a faxed copy of a reprint request, all done without human intervention. A voice warns, however, at the outset that there are "no photos for personal use." (Someone whose picture has appeared in the paper, however, can get a print from the photo department.)

The New York TIMes and The Washington Post do offer some of their historic photos for personal use, perhaps to frame and hang in the home or office.

The New York TIMes is aggressively marketing some of its images for personal use through full-page ads in the newspaper. One ad offers six images, marking the 20th anniversary of the "Science TIMes" section, as "exhibition quality 11"x14" black-and-white matte print(s), hand- printed from vintage photographs housed in TIMes Photo Archives."

They are priced at $1,000 for the six or $195 each ($900 and $175 for home-delivery customers) and depict Albert Einstein, Margaret Mead, Orville Wright in flight, an mit computer, Sir Edmund Hilary on Mt. Everest, and someone receiving a polio vaccination. The last picture, by Ernie Sisto, is the only one for which the photographer is identified.

Another New York TIMes ad, "Photographic Memories," offers six other photos from the "Statue of Liberty Photo Collection" for the same prices, except that the photographer of five of the six pictures is identified and signed prints of these five are offered at $500 each or $2,500 for all six ($450 and $2,250 for subscribers). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

From Page One to Your Office Wall
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.