White House Blamed for Secret Unit at Waco: Delta Force for Fighting Terrorism, Not Law Enforcement

By Scarborough, Rowan | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 27, 1999 | Go to article overview

White House Blamed for Secret Unit at Waco: Delta Force for Fighting Terrorism, Not Law Enforcement


Scarborough, Rowan, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The three Delta Force commandos at the Branch Davidian compound in April 1993 were part of an elite unit the military secretly founded in 1977 to combat world terrorism.

While their use as on-scene observers was legal, a military expert is faulting the Clinton administration for putting the soldiers in a domestic law enforcement setting where innocent people died in a horrible blaze.

Said Al Santoli, a House national security aide, "Delta Force is our most sophisticated task force against terrorists and to think that Delta would be used is an abuse of their power and an abuse of their mandate. What happened in Waco was strictly a law enforcement matter."

"Delta Force is not hostage negotiating. They are action guys against terrorists," said Mr. Santoli, an aide to Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, California Republican. "They are experts who deal with the most violent and sophisticated international terrorist forces."

A Pentagon spokesman said yesterday the three Special Forces soldiers were at Waco strictly as observers in hopes of learning something new on hostage rescue.

For years, the Pentagon refused to acknowledge Delta Force's existence, even as such public failures as Desert One and Somalia came to light. Now, the military concedes there is such a 400-man unit trained in a fenced area of Fort Bragg, N.C., home to the Joint Special Operations Command. But its work still remains top secret.

Delta Force was the brainchild of two hardened Vietnam warriors, Col. Charles Beckwith and Maj. Richard Meadows. They recognized that the growing threat of global terrorism heightened the prospect that Americans would be taken hostage overseas. A special unit was needed, they argued, to rescue them.

Unfortunately, Delta Force's first notoriety stemmed from failure. Some of its members participated in the botched Desert One operation in 1979 to free 66 American hostages from the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

White House Blamed for Secret Unit at Waco: Delta Force for Fighting Terrorism, Not Law Enforcement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.