Venable, Tucker Flyer Merging Their Law Offices

By Marco, Donna De | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 9, 1999 | Go to article overview

Venable, Tucker Flyer Merging Their Law Offices


Marco, Donna De, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Venable, a law firm with offices in Washington and Baltimore and their suburbs, is merging with Tucker Flyer in a move to increase its representation of start-up, entrepreneurial-based businesses.

The merger - effective Jan. 1 - will add 50 lawyers to Venable's ranks, increasing its D.C. office to more than 180 people.

The decision to merge is a result of the expanding needs of the clients for both firms.

"This invitation to dance was not one Venable could pass up," said Bill Coston, managing partner of Venable's D.C. office. "Tucker Flyer is considered a premium business firm and leaders in their field."

Tucker Flyer, formerly Tucker, Flyer & Lewis, is a commercial law firm that represents entrepreneurial companies, including wireless telephone company Teligent in Vienna, Va., and AppNet, an e-business solutions company in Bethesda.

"The principal focus of this combination is to ensure all start-up and young technology companies in Northern Virginia and Maryland that we are a full-service firm," Mr. Coston said.

Venable, also known as Venable, Beatjer & Howard, was founded a century ago in Baltimore and represented such businesses as banks and trust companies. Since then the firm has grown to four other offices in Washington, Tysons Corner, Rockville and Towson, and clients now include Lockheed Martin, Compaq and Marriott.

The D.C. office was started about 18 years ago by former U.S. Attorney General Benjamin R. Civiletti, whose name was added to the firm's Washington office only. To prevent confusion, the entire firm began calling itself Venable about five years ago. The merger with Tucker Flyer, which will give Venable a total of 350 lawyers, comes less than a year after Venable joined forces with Spencer Frank, an intellectual property law firm in Washington. …

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