Thank You MOS - We Must Save Parks, Not Let Them Go to Ruin; Letters Special

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), October 7, 2018 | Go to article overview

Thank You MOS - We Must Save Parks, Not Let Them Go to Ruin; Letters Special


The Mail on Sunday's campaign to save our parks is to be applauded.

Perpetual cuts have led to many of our once beautiful parks being neglected or not maintained. Flowerbeds are now full of weeds, or have been concreted over.

Gardeners have been laid off and the land sold. This is a warped logic. A beautiful park can lift spirits and not only enhance an area, but provide a haven for wildlife. Parks not only improve the environment, but they are very beneficial to our health and wellbeing. Britain is a beautiful country but our parks are in need of major investment for the benefit of all. They should be better maintained and protected, not left neglected. They are becoming eyesores and not what the Victorians designed them for.

Nick Fletcher, Malton, North Yorkshire

The Mail on Sunday is so right to highlight this alarming lack of concern and deplorable decrease in park resources. Glasgow could once boast more parks than any other city in Europe. Not now.

John Cusack, via email

This excellent and long overdue campaign will reach a very large number of people and hopefully a large number of local authorities.

Access to our parks, gardens and green spaces is essential to everyone in our villages, towns, cities and the suburbs. They are where children hang out, where parents push prams, the elderly sit in the sun and everyone can enjoy a picnic.

Gilly Drummond, Vice Life President,

The Gardens Trust This campaign will, I am sure, attract strong support. The need for such an initiative is another example of the inability of the Scottish Government and our local authorities to manage their financial resources on our behalf.

A robust audit should be carried out to establish where taxpayers' funds are being spent and why.

C. Mackenzie, Invergordon, Ross-shire.

I salute The Mail on Sunday for its major campaign to halt the decline of our parks. It was shocking and sad to read how thousands of our spaces are falling by the wayside into disrepair or being sold off by cash-strapped councils. Our lovely, picturesque green spaces and parks since Victorian times have had a special place in the hearts of millions of people and given visitors many happy memories. All of us should throw our weight behind The Mail on Sunday's vital campaign and do everything possible to Save Our Parks.

David Courtney, Weston-Super-Mare

I hope your campaign makes a difference. In Ayr, the Old Racecourse Park is under threat from a new golf academy. The Common Good Land is used by so many different groups, especially young football clubs. Why take away a facility that is used by the many and not just a few? Not long ago a school tried to access these grounds and was turned down as it is common ground. I wonder if the council then knew of the golf academy plans and the potential money to be made?

Name supplied, Ayr

What a great campaign. I thought I was alone in my quest to get something done regarding the downfall of our parks.

Angie Smith, Maidstone, Kent

It's a disgrace that council parks are being sold off or left in disrepair. For years they have been part of our culture, a place to meet up, play and relax, especially in built-up areas. They allow a daily break from home for some and a space for togetherness for others. But like everything else these days, they are now an after-thought - although local authorities continue to take our council tax collections and assume we won't notice. Well, councils should take note that the public want their parks back.

Archie Mackinnon, Glasgow

Politicians keep urging people to get off their backsides and use parks to keep healthy and fit to ease the burden of the NHS treating people for obesity and other related conditions, yet they take from us the means to avoid these ailments.

Keith Martin, via email

I am astonished that as a nation we now struggle to maintain our public parks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Thank You MOS - We Must Save Parks, Not Let Them Go to Ruin; Letters Special
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.