NIEHS: Making a Mark on Translational Research Science

By Collman, Gwen W.; Berridge, Brian R. et al. | Environmental Health Perspectives, August 2018 | Go to article overview

NIEHS: Making a Mark on Translational Research Science


Collman, Gwen W., Berridge, Brian R., Hall, Janet E., Woychik, Rick, Zeldin, Darryl C., Birnbaum, Linda S., Environmental Health Perspectives


The National Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS) is introducing a new paradigm for conducting, communicating, and evaluating translational research efforts in environmental health science. In "Expanding the Concept of Translational Research: Making a Place for Environmental Health Sciences," Pettibone et al. (2018) use the concepts of translational research proposed by earlier authors to inform an innovative approach to thinking about the dynamic nature of environmental health research as it moves in multiple directions. This new framework reflects a broad range of environmental health research activities that are conducted as part of translational research, while still incorporating the traditional clinical translational research activities.

Translational research is embedded in NIEHS's mission of discovering how the environment affects people to promote healthier lives, and is a core concept within our (NIEHS's) strategic plan. "While translational approaches in medical research are sometimes referred to as bench-to-bedside, NIEHS research results in much broader applications, which have in common an emphasis on preventing adverse health consequences from environmental exposure. NIEHS research moves through multiple translational pathways, not just to the bedside, but to the community, to individual behaviors and choices, and to wider public policy changes and public health practice" (NIEHS 2012). As such, translational research is conducted and supported throughout the institute, in our extramural grant program, in our intramural research, and in the work of the National Toxicology Program, to inform regulatory programs, activities, and policies.

As the leadership team of the Institute, we anticipate that the framework will have many benefits. Establishing a shared understanding and common vocabulary for discussing translational research in the environmental health sciences context supports our strategic plan and provides a structure for researchers to clearly articulate the complex, multiyear process of scientific discovery and impacts. The framework can be used as a tool to categorize and evaluate research as it moves across, around, within, and through translational phases. It enables us to discern and give more recognition to important handoffs that were previously grouped together as "basic" or "discovery" research. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

NIEHS: Making a Mark on Translational Research Science
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.