Gay Tackles a Burning Issue; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Daily Mail (London), October 23, 2018 | Go to article overview

Gay Tackles a Burning Issue; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS


Byline: Compiled by Charles Legge

QUESTION Whatever happened to the people who burned PS1million, as featured on The Late Late Show? Was real money burned in the stunt? IN 1995, when Gay Byrne was still presenting The Late Late Show, one of the programme's most controversial interviews took place, featuring two artists and musicians from Britain who had burned PS1million in real money the year before.

The artists concerned were Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty, who performed as an electronic group called The KLF, and formed an art foundation called the K Foundation in 1993.

The following year, on August 23, 1994, they burned PS1million in real money, in the form of bundles of PS50 notes, in a disused boathouse on the Scottish island of Jura.

They also filmed the proceedings and the film was laboriously titled, Watch the K Foundation Burn a Million Quid.

Drummond and Cauty weren't exactly sure why they organised the burning of all this money, although it was allegedly in the name of art. About PS900,000 worth of notes were burned in the fire, while the remaining PS100,000 went up the chimney in the hot air from the fire and weren't burned.

A decade later, when Drummond was interviewed on the BBC, he was asked if he regretted burning all that money, which had come from record sales. He replied: 'Of course I regret it, who wouldn't? My children especially regret it but I don't regret it all the time.' The interview with Drummond and Cauty on The Late Late Show had been bizarre and surreal, to say the least, and for some reason, another musician involved in the programme was Joe Elliott from Def Leppard. While the interview didn't go down very well with the studio audience, some viewers who saw and remember it say that it was their all-time favourite segment on the show.

As for the two artists who had organised the money burning, they are both still alive and working.

Bill Drummond, a Scottish artist, musician and record producer, was born in Scotland in 1953. In the 1980s, he was the co-founder of avant garde pop group The KLF, and in the 1990s formed the K Foundation. After his musical relationship with Jimmy Cauty ended in 1997, he engaged in all kinds of other activities, artistic and otherwise. In one scheme, he offered to make soup for people, while in another, he made and delivered cakes.

In 2014, he started a world painting tour, which he says will continue until 2025.

He also has a connection with Ireland: he owns the Curfew Tower in Cushendall, Co. Antrim, which is used as an artists' residency.

As for Jimmy Cauty, born on the Wirral peninsula in Cheshire in 1956, after his involvement in music with Bill Drummond, and that infamous money burning, he went on to produce more music. He had his own recording studios in Brighton.

He also produced many art installations and one of his most recent works came when he created Smiley Riot Shields.

He painted police riot shields yellow with a smiley face, designed originally as a symbol of nonviolent direct action.

The two men have both had bizarre careers but nothing they did was stranger than their burning of PS1million in real banknotes and their subsequent half-baked explanations on The Late Late Show.

Declan McCord, Co. Mayo.

QUESTION Do any migrating birds circumnavigate the Earth? THE wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) circumnavigates the globe in the southern sub-Antarctic latitudes.

This was described in a 2005 article Global Circumnavigations: Tracking Year-Round Ranges Of Non-breeding Albatrosses, in the journal Science, following a study led by Professor John Croxall, head of conservation biology for the British Antarctic Survey.

The team tracked the precise movements of 22 birds and showed 12 had made global circumnavigations - three birds circled the Earth twice. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Gay Tackles a Burning Issue; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.