Music Therapy & Mindfulness: Brooklyn Music School Launches New Creative Arts Therapy Program

The Exceptional Parent, September 2018 | Go to article overview

Music Therapy & Mindfulness: Brooklyn Music School Launches New Creative Arts Therapy Program


Brooklyn Music School (BMS) announces its new Music Therapy program, offering services for individuals and groups, from ages 5 to 95, beginning in October 2018. Group sessions and classes run in 10-week cycles and take place at 126 St. Felix Street, Brooklyn, NY 11217. Tuition starts at $22 per class and registration is available at www.brooklynmusicschool.org/music-therapy. For Individual Sessions and more information, please call (718) 638-5660.

BMS Music Therapy offers a range of programming, including weekly Sound Meditation classes in the morning and evening, relaxation and creative expression for seniors, and creative expression through music for all ages. BMS Music Therapy provides option for both individualized and group therapy, so as to meet the specific needs of children and adults in Brooklyn's diverse community. In the therapeutic relationship, the emotional, psycho-social, and developmental needs of our clients are considered and addressed in the process of creating music together through mutual and mindful listening, creative inquiry, and self-expression.

Music therapy services are provided by board-certified, licensed music therapists and seasoned sound meditation practitioners under the clinical supervision of Director of Music Therapy Katie Down, (MT-BC, LCAT). All sessions are in compliance with the HIPAA and AMTA Codes of Ethics & Standards.

"Creative arts therapies are now recognized as an essential component to health and wellbeing in hospitals, clinics, and schools. BMS music therapists are trained in the most up-to-date music therapy practices in order to provide a high standard of services," said Katie Down, Director of Music Therapy. "Music has a way of connecting us no matter our age, cultural background, cognitive and physical ability, and these approaches can help to relieve pain and anxiety, enable positive thinking and creativity, and facilitate a profound sense of wellbeing and connection. …

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