Realizing Mission-Driven Development: After Starting Her Career in the Nonprofit World with Several Larger Organizations, in 2015 Lauren Petersen Began Working at OneOC, Whose Mission Is to Accelerate Nonprofit Success through Volunteering, Training, Consulting, and Business Services. in Her Role, She Acts as the Liaison between Companies, Individuals, and Foundations

By Petersen, Lauren | Talent Development, October 2018 | Go to article overview

Realizing Mission-Driven Development: After Starting Her Career in the Nonprofit World with Several Larger Organizations, in 2015 Lauren Petersen Began Working at OneOC, Whose Mission Is to Accelerate Nonprofit Success through Volunteering, Training, Consulting, and Business Services. in Her Role, She Acts as the Liaison between Companies, Individuals, and Foundations


Petersen, Lauren, Talent Development


How can learning contribute to the success of nonprofits?

Learning is huge for nonprofits, because it helps everyone innovate. It sparks new ideas, which makes them better able to fulfill their missions.

Another reason that learning is valuable for nonprofits is because you don't go to school to work at these organizations. You fall into them because they're your passion, and it's a sector in which you must become a lifelong learner. It's always evolving, which means there's a lot to keep up with.

What are the biggest learning-related challenges for nonprofits?

It's sad, because the two biggest challenges are time and money. We obviously can't do anything about time, but nonprofits have notoriously underinvested in learning and professional development. They historically spend much less on it than do corporations, and this is because talent development is one of the easiest things to cut from a budget. However, the funding community is starting to see that nonprofits can't have the impact they want unless they invest in developing their human capital.

What resources do you see nonprofits using to provide professional development to their employees?

Nonprofits that operate at the national and international levels often have internal talent development capabilities, but small and midsize nonprofits turn to external service providers. Professional associations, organizations like OneOC, and funders can all provide training, but even something designed and delivered in-house can improve organizational capacity and reduce turnover. …

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Realizing Mission-Driven Development: After Starting Her Career in the Nonprofit World with Several Larger Organizations, in 2015 Lauren Petersen Began Working at OneOC, Whose Mission Is to Accelerate Nonprofit Success through Volunteering, Training, Consulting, and Business Services. in Her Role, She Acts as the Liaison between Companies, Individuals, and Foundations
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