Creativity Can Be the Bridge between Science and Humanities Education; Professor of Creativity at Cardiff Metropolitan University Gareth Loudon Looks at How Creativity Can Help Pupils and Students Develop Complex Problem Solving and Critical Thinking Skills

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 1, 2018 | Go to article overview

Creativity Can Be the Bridge between Science and Humanities Education; Professor of Creativity at Cardiff Metropolitan University Gareth Loudon Looks at How Creativity Can Help Pupils and Students Develop Complex Problem Solving and Critical Thinking Skills


Byline: Gareth Loudon

IN HIS famous Rede Lecture of 1959, chemist and novelist C P Snow spoke of the separation of science and the humanities, and the lack of respect and understanding that often exists between the fields. He argued that this was detrimental to the future success of the country as many creative breakthroughs come from the interaction between the two cultures.

Snow put a large part of the blame on what he called "our fanatical belief in educational specialisation" and focusing on "producing a tiny elite educated in one academic skill". Unfortunately, not much seems to have changed.

The World Economic Forum's 2016 future of jobs report highlighted that most educational systems still "provide highly siloed training" with a "dichotomy between humanities and sciences". But industry needs people who can take on cross-functional roles and have technical, social and analytic skills. The report went on to list complex problem solving, critical thinking and creativity as the top three skills needed in the workforce by 2020.

One way to address these challenges in schools, colleges and universities is to make creativity a core part of the curriculum. We know creativity as the ability to come up with ideas or things that are new and valuable.

But I would argue that creativity includes critical (or convergent) thinking as well as divergent thinking - that is, the exploration of a range of possible ideas or solutions.

Creativity might traditionally be associated with the arts and humanities, but it is equally important for complex problem solving in science, technology, engineering and maths. Important creativity skills include listening, observation and empathy as well as experimentation, collaboration and analysis - skills from humanities and science.

Creativity is also driven by having a sense of purpose, of wanting to be better at something, and having the freedom to work in a flexible way. So it naturally demands and creates a bridge between the humanities and science.

It is not so common for a student to be an expert in both science and humanities, or even want to be - but this is not important. What is important is that students recognise the value of all subjects, and the role they can play in generating new ideas or things of value. Whether that value is for personal learning and growth, for communities or organisations, or for society as a whole.

There is a strong push currently to get more UK students to study STEM subjects. I am not against this effort, but I think it is also important to recognise that technology companies need workers who have skills in understanding people, society and culture. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Creativity Can Be the Bridge between Science and Humanities Education; Professor of Creativity at Cardiff Metropolitan University Gareth Loudon Looks at How Creativity Can Help Pupils and Students Develop Complex Problem Solving and Critical Thinking Skills
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.