Confession

The Christian Century, September 22, 1999 | Go to article overview

Confession


IT IS heartening to hear a Reformed pastor in the Netherlands come out in favor of the sacrament of reconciliation ("Bring back confession," News, Aug. 11-18).

Confession need not be seen as something esoteric or authoritarian. The first rubric to the reconciliation of a penitent in the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer establishes the context for this rite. "The ministry of reconciliation, which has been committed by Christ to his Church, is exercised through the care each Christian has for others, through the common prayer of Christians assembled for public worship, and through the priesthood of the Church and its ministers declaring absolution." Confession is one activity among many that apply the reconciling work of Christ to specific situations.

There's much to learn about confession from the Roman Catholic perspective and experience. But any church rediscovering this practice ought to consider every tradition in which sacramental confession is a living reality, including Anglicanism and the various Eastern churches, and then allow its own practice to develop under the guidance of scripture and sanctified common sense. Beyond that, all of us can learn from instances of reconciliation in public and private where, even if his name is never spoken, Christ is active.

The millennium is based on the coming of Christ 2,000 years ago. Perhaps many are starting to recognize that he joined the human race not simply to live, die and rise, or even to save us from our sins, but to reconcile all people with God and one another. That reconciliation is both our greatest need and our greatest hope.

Charles Hoffacker
St. Paul's Episcopal Church,
Port Huron, Mich.

Church on the Web...

I WAS gratified to read Michael L. Keene's article "The church on the Web" (Aug. 11-18). Here are two more opportunities for pastors who preach from the lectionary:

Sermonshop on Ecunet: If you wish to receive sermonshop, send a note to sermonshop-request@ecunet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Confession
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.