The Magic of Stephen Hawking

Skeptic (Altadena, CA), Spring 1999 | Go to article overview

The Magic of Stephen Hawking


DURING A WEEK IN MARCH, 1999, was an invited speaker at the American Physical Society Centennial meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. The Society also had me do my Magic Tricks-Science Facts show all over Atlanta that week for Jr. and Sr. high schools, for the public in auditoriums, and at the Fernbank Science Museum. It has been claimed that this was the largest meeting of physicists ever held, over 8,500 by official count. To my great excitement, Stephen Hawking was the guest of honor and would be present for my performance.

At an evening cocktail party people milled around waiting to meet Stephen Hawking. When he glided into the room in his wheelchair, the place grew silent. Just being in the same room with him gave us all a sense of awe. People went up and started to talk to him. He responded with his voice synthesized computer.

Then I got up the nerve to walk over to him and ask him if he liked magic. His response: "I love magic?'

"Would you care to see some tricks? I asked. He responded as enthusiastically as you can through a computer voice synthesizer: "Yes!"

With a deck of cards I did some color changes, made the full deck vanish, and then produced the cards from my mouth. He laughed at the unexpected end. The press photographers went crazy taking many photos of me, Bob Friedhoffer from the Bronx, entertaining the man who might arguably be the most influential scientist of the 20th century's latter half. He is the Michael Jordan of science, the Bruce Springsteen of cosmology.

Then I gave up my spot to someone else, and enjoyed talking to some of the other guests at the party.

Later we went to the Civic Center to hear Hawking give his presentation, a talk entitled "The Universe in a Nutshell?' His explanations (aided by some visuals) were exhilarating. Not only did he make the cosmos understandable, he made it enjoyable, and even funny.

Afterwards there was a small party for invited guests, including my daughter Nikki, her friend Shondra and myself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Magic of Stephen Hawking
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.