Christians Are Few in the Holy Land as History, Economics Take Toll

By Ruether, Rosemary Radford | National Catholic Reporter, October 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Christians Are Few in the Holy Land as History, Economics Take Toll


Ruether, Rosemary Radford, National Catholic Reporter


There has been growing alarm in some Christian circles that the local Palestinian Christian community is disappearing. The statistics are indeed alarming. Christians were the overwhelming majority in the Holy Land, with only a tiny Jewish presence, when the Muslims took over the area in the seventh century. During the subsequent centuries of Muslim rule, Christian numbers dwindled. Christians and Jews were tolerated by Muslims, but were second-class citizens, and many Christians converted to Islam.

Yet at the beginning of British rule of the area in the 1920s Christians were still 20 percent of the Palestinian Arab community. Today they have dwindled to a bare 4.5 percent of Palestinian Arabs in Israel and the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza. Many fear that local Christians will become so few that the Christian presence will be only monuments staffed by foreign priests, rather than a living Christian church. A Christian church that can trace its roots to the first Christians, a church that lives in the storied sites of Jerusalem, Bethlehem and Nazareth will have disappeared.

There is a widespread perception in the United States that this dwindling of the Palestinian Christians is due to Muslim hostility, that Muslim militants who desire a Muslim state have made life intolerable for Christians. This perception is strongly contested by Palestinian Christians. In recent trips to the Holy Land, Christians I spoke with insisted that Palestinians see themselves as one people, Muslim and Christian. The Palestinian Liberation Organization, led by Yasir Arafat -- himself married to a woman of Christian family -- is committed to a secular democratic state. While the dwindling Christian presence should be of concern to Western Christians, this question needs to be put in a larger historical and socioeconomic context.

Although Christians have been a historic community in the Holy Land from the first century, they have been deeply fragmented over the centuries by the various schisms that have rent the Christian church. They have also suffered from ecclesiastic colonialism from dominant churches allied with imperial powers in the West.

In 451 the Council of Chalcedon, which decided the orthodox formula for the two natures of Christ, split the Greek and Latin churches that accepted this formula from churches of the Middle East and Egypt, many of which did not accept the formula. These non-Chalcedonian Oriental churches became separate communions, the Syrian Jacobite, Armenian and Coptic churches. These Christians were persecuted by the Byzantine Orthodox, centered in the Eastern Roman empire of Constantinople, who sought to force them to accept the Orthodox formula. When the Muslims took over the area, their rule was passively accepted by many of these non-Chalcedonian Christians who saw themselves as being delivered from Byzantine rule.

During the crusades, Latin Christians invaded the Holy Land and treated the local Christians as infidels as much as the Muslims. However, the friendly ties established between the Muslim rulers and Francis of Assisi resulted: in the Franciscans being given the oversight of Christian places in the Holy Land, such as Church of the Annunciation in Nazareth. This Franciscan presence is still very evident. Foreign priests typically run major Christian sites, so that local Christians are excluded from control of their own sacred sites.

In the 18th century, Rome established contacts with both old Oriental and Eastern Orthodox churches, creating branches of these churches in communion with Rome. But the effect of this was to further fragment these historical churches. Uniate branches were allowed to keep their historic rites, but split from their historic communities. …

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