Secret Life of Satirists; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Daily Mail (London), November 28, 2018 | Go to article overview

Secret Life of Satirists; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS


Byline: Compiled by Charles Legge

QUESTION Part of Banksy's fame rests on his ability to remain anonymous. Have any other artists used this tactic? THE street artist Black Hand is known as Iran's Banksy. In an authoritarian society, he takes his life in his hands every time he creates graffiti.

His grim mural of an auction of human kidneys satirised Iran's legal organ trade. This was whitewashed by authorities - though not before it was photographed and uploaded on the internet.

Under widespread state censorship, art in Iran is confined to private galleries. By plastering his work on walls, the Black Hand aims to break this culture.

Dede is an anonymous urban artist from Israel. His works pop up to challenge the inhabitants of Tel Aviv. His signature is a Band-Aid plaster.

Alec Monopoly is an American graffiti and street artist who satirises capitalism with his depictions of Mr Monopoly and other cultural figures - from Scrooge McDuck to Darth Vader advertising Chanel.

Karen Moore, Skelton, Cleveland. FOR most artists, the creation of art is about attaching a lasting legacy to their name. Historically, however, many artists did not assign authorship to their work, often for religious reasons, allowing their inspiration to do the talking.

Unidentified artists from history have been given the title Master. They might be named after the place where they plied their trade, for instance, the Master of Delft, or after specific works, such as Master of the Gardens of Love.

One of the most intriguing was the Master of the Playing Cards. An engraver from the mid-1400s in Cologne, Germany, he was considered the first great master of printmaking, based on the spread of not only his works, but the art of those who were influenced by him.

At the time, card decks were crude representations. Three dimensions and realistic shading were relatively new concepts that artists, not engravers, tended to employ.

The Master took those skills and applied them to woodcuts and engravings of deer, birds, beasts and wild men, using woodcuts held together in a frame to make each card, much like the movable type of Gutenberg's printing press.

The Master of the Furies was an expert ivory sculptor working in the early 17th century. His existence wasn't established until the Seventies when Erwin Neumann, curator at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, began assembling his works.

His 25 sculptures depict the human form in exquisite detail. They are named Furies because they are all shouting or screaming.

Marcus Andrews, Leighton Buzzard, Beds.

QUESTION Do Urdu speakers consider the liver to be the centre of emotions rather than the heart? NOTIONS of the heart being the centre of the emotions is known as cardiocentrism. However, abdominocentrism is the predominant approach in much of Southern Asia and Polynesia.

In these cultures, feelings are said to be located in the belly, liver or kidneys. This is reflected in English sayings such as lily-livered (meaning cowardly) and liverish (unhappy or bad-tempered).

Urdu is the native language of Pakistan.

Here, the liver replaces the heart as the centre of emotions, as in the term jan e jigar - 'the strength (power) of my liver', a term of endearment. …

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