Help Make Change-And Keep Up

By Reynolds, Abigail R. | Techniques, September 1999 | Go to article overview

Help Make Change-And Keep Up


Reynolds, Abigail R., Techniques


Career and technical education has been an important part of my life. As an eighth-grade student, I remember walking down the hallways of Sutton High School in Sutton, W.Va., and peeking into the home economics classroom to see the sewing machines and smell the cooking aromas. I also remember stopping to listen to the rhythm of manual typewriters from the typing room and gazing out the back door of the school to see the white "vo-ag" building.

I knew the home economics teacher would teach me how to cook delicious foods and show me how to make an a-line dress in sewing class as a ninth-grader. In the 10th grade, I would enroll in typing class and Mrs. McPherson would show me (with a giggle and a smile) how to manipulate those big, gray Royal manual typewriters. But I knew I'd never get the opportunity to have a class in that white vo-ag building with the enormous garage doors. Back then girls were not permitted in vo-ag and shop class.

Over the years career and technical education has changed so much that it's hard to imagine not having young women in agriscience classes. Balancing career and family is a focus of family and consumer sciences education, and many of those heavy typewriters have been replaced with laptop computers. Today our students are discovering career opportunities through high-tech lab activities, applied learning coursework, internships, mentorships, job shadowing and much more.

Who has been responsible for so many progressive changes? And who is leading the way for future changes? These answers lie in the strong leadership from your state and national ACTE associations.

The ACTE Board of Directors and headquarters staff are helping you prepare career and technical education for the new century. The board is currently working on several initiatives that members have helped identify. …

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