The Best Lgbt Graphic Novels of 2018

By Anderson-Minshall, Jacob | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), December 2018 | Go to article overview

The Best Lgbt Graphic Novels of 2018


Anderson-Minshall, Jacob, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


The best graphic novels of 2018 seem to have fallen into two genres this year: memoirs and fiction centering around queer love. Here are the hest of both worlds:

Pinky & Pepper Forever by Ivy Atoms is a dark comedy about two teen puppy girls, determined to stay together through high school, death, and hell itself. (Silver Sprocket)

On a Sunbeam by award-winning graphic novelist Tillie Waiden is an epic love story featuring two timelines, school girls in love, and a ragtag crew traveling through space piecing the past together. (First Second)

In Zodiac Starforce Volume 2: Cries of The Fire Prince by Kevin Panetta zodiac-inspired superheroine teens, including lesbian couple Savanna and Lili, join the fight against a new demon, named Pavos. (Dark Horse)

QUEER LOVE

The Smell of Starving Boys by author Loo Hui Phang and Frederik Peeters, is a sumptuously--illustrated, thoroughly-modern Western with gay and trans characters and a compelling storyline. (SelfMadeHero)

Skin & Earth by bi musician Lights is a companion piece to her album of the same name, and a journey of self-discovery set in a post-apocalyptic future with a heroine pulled between romance, cults, gods, and mortals. (Dynamite Comics)

Tee Franklin's Bingo Love features two queer women of color who fall in love as teens, are torn apart, and later reunited as grandmothers. Authenticity is found in the characters' skin tones, black hair, full figures, and visible stretch marks. (Image Comics)

The Secret Loves of Geeks edited by Hope Nicholson includes work by pansexual, genderqueer, ace, transgender, lesbian, bi, and queer creators. …

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