City of L.A. Takes Delegates `on Location' Mobile Workshops Will Showcase Local Successes

Nation's Cities Weekly, October 11, 1999 | Go to article overview

City of L.A. Takes Delegates `on Location' Mobile Workshops Will Showcase Local Successes


Los Angeles is "the place" for higher education. L.A. is home to 176 colleges and universities, including the campuses of the University of California, and seven campuses of the California State College and University system. Many private colleges are also located in the City of Los Angeles, such as the University of Southern California, Cal Tech, Claremont College, the Fashion Institute of Design and Occidental College.

And, Los Angeles is the perfect place to host a series of cutting-edge educational workshops for the delegates of the National League of Cities.

These workshops will not be held in your typical classroom setting. The City of Los Angeles is going to take delegates "on location" for a series interactive mobile workshops that showcase the innovative civic and community programs offered in the City of Angels.

Delegates attending the National League of Cities convention will have the opportunity to literally see and experience everything these seminars and workshops have to offer. An expert in the field or specialty being covered will facilitate each workshop.

The Workshops

The L.A. Mobile Workshops' line-up for Thursday, December 2nd and Friday, December 3rd includes the following activities:

* LAPD Blue. Here, delegates will attend The LAPD Edward M. Davis Emergency Vehicle Operations Course (EVOC), where they will receive instruction on police tactics, firearms and emergency vehicle operations. Highlights include the Interactive Driving Simulator which features challenging interactive vehicle maneuvers and scenarios; the Simulation Village Demonstration, including response tactics utilized by LAPD officers; and a High Speed Driving Demonstration, illustrating the proper way to maintain control of a vehicle during a high speed driving exercise.

* L.A. Is An Urban Canvas. This workshop offers an introduction to the "Public Art Program." In 1989, the City of Los Angels adopted a series of landmark ordinances that required a one percent proportion of the value of new construction over $500,000 be allocated to support and develop the arts. Results include commissions of artist-designed elements in building projects, as well as support for the City's "Murals Project." Murals are integral part of cultural expression in the Los Angeles. The city has funded the public murals projects since the 1970s.

* Delegates Dock At Port of L.A. -- See and experience the Port of Los Angeles, one of the busiest ports in the nation, on this afternoon boat tour. The Port of L.A. is a magnificent gateway for international trade and commerce. Twenty-nine diverse, state-of-the-art cargo facilities are located here.

Looking to the future.... The Port will complete its $600 million capital improvement development program, which includes its Pier 300/400 Implementation Program and expanded World Cruise Center, by the year 2020. …

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