Steve Itugbu. 2017. Foreign Policy and Leadership in Nigeria: Obasanjo and the Challenge of African Diplomacy

By Basiru, Adeniyi S. | African Studies Quarterly, September 2018 | Go to article overview

Steve Itugbu. 2017. Foreign Policy and Leadership in Nigeria: Obasanjo and the Challenge of African Diplomacy


Basiru, Adeniyi S., African Studies Quarterly


Steve Itugbu. 2017. Foreign Policy and Leadership in Nigeria: Obasanjo and the Challenge of African Diplomacy. London/New York: I.B Tauris & Co Ltd. 275 pp.

In territories with a longer history of Weberian statehood, foreign policy decision-making appears so routinized and bureaucratized to the extent that every major foreign policy decision tends to be a product of dialogue, consultation, and consensus among the various stake-holders within the state apparatus. However, this truism would seem not to be the case in Africa in which foreign policy decision-making processes are not only debureaucratized but also personalized by the heads of government. This state of affairs, over the years, would seem to have impacted on the quality of African states' responses to foreign policy challenges. Perhaps, the observation of this scenario motivated the writing of this book. As author Steve Itugbu avers, "aside from the political intrigues within the AU and its insistence upon assuming sole responsibility to resolve conflict, the events in Darfur demonstrated that many African states had strongmen leaders who personalized the conduct of foreign policy" (p. 1).

With an empirical insight from how Chief Olusegun Obasanjo, Nigeria's president (1999-2007), handled the Darfur crisis, the 275-page book attempts to lay bare the problematic associated with de-bureaucratized and personalized diplomacy in Africa. It starts with a well crafted introduction in which the author not only sets the background and the rationale that informed the writing of the book but most importantly presents the methodology and the theoretical framework that frame the major arguments in the book. Specifically, he anoints Graham Allison's classic foreign policy decision models for this task. In the author's words, "this book seeks to explore, scrutinize and determines the constituency of Allison's model with regard to African realities" (p. 4). In the first chapter, the author would seem to have set out to achieve two tasks. First, an attempt is made to xray Obasanjo's personality and the historical, cultural, and sociological variables that shaped it. Perhaps, the aim here is to explain the roles these variables have played in influencing Obasanjo's attitude towards foreign policy. Second, the author dissects operational factors that had for decades shaped Nigeria's Afro-centric policy. The central thesis that the author seems to put across to readers in this chapter is that Obasanjo's action to lead the intervention in Darfur was informed by the country's foundational principle of putting Africa first. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Steve Itugbu. 2017. Foreign Policy and Leadership in Nigeria: Obasanjo and the Challenge of African Diplomacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.