Charters Face Tough Rules: Advocates See Schools Too Restricted

By Ferrechio, Susan | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 11, 1998 | Go to article overview

Charters Face Tough Rules: Advocates See Schools Too Restricted


Ferrechio, Susan, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Maryland will regulate its first charter schools by imposing many of the same rules and restrictions that now govern public schools, a move advocates say will stifle the movement.

The state's Task Force on Charter Schools recommended to Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday that Baltimore and each county determine how many of the schools to permit, according to the draft bill that will be submitted to the General Assembly when it convenes next month.

The draft, a copy of which was obtained by The Washington Times, stipulates public charter schools be subject to most local and state education regulations and requirements as of next July.

Those include testing programs and teachers unions, unless the charter schools get waivers from state and county school officials.

Only one charter school - the Stadium School in Baltimore - exists in Maryland.

Advocates of charter schools said they are disappointed the legislation, if passed, would create among the weakest charter schools in the country. It would put Maryland on a list of restrictive states that include Mississippi, Arkansas and Rhode Island, they said.

The Maryland General Assembly last year appointed the 12-member task force, which is headed by Montgomery County School Superintendent Paul L. Vance, to draft legislation that would permit the state to be eligible for more than $70 million in federal start-up money for charter schools.

"The Maryland legislation doesn't want charter schools, they want federal money," said Jeanne Allen, president of the Center for Education Reform, which advocates charter schools and educational reform initiatives. "They are trying to concoct anything they can to pass muster and it simply won't do."

Charter schools, which are publicly funded but privately operated, are intended to work independently of the public system, thus allowing them to be innovative.

Critics said the proposed Maryland law will stifle educational creativity.

"I don't think there will be a lot of charter school activity with this law because it's quite restrictive," said Joni Gardner, president of the Maryland Coalition for Educational Reform, a grass-roots organization that advocates alternatives to public education. "If it passes like this, the schools will basically be charter schools in name only."

Miss Gardner said she hopes the legislature will amend the proposal to make it less restrictive.

Mr. Vance was away on a school board retreat yesterday and was not available to comment on the draft.

Mr. Glendening, a Democrat, is not expected to comment on the proposal until near the end of January, when he comes out with a legislative agenda in his State of the State address, said spokesman Don Vandrey.

State legislators may have to change the law or risk suffering the same fate as Virginia, which in October was denied federal funds by the U.S. Department of Education. Federal education officials said the charter school law that took effect in Virginia on July 1 is too restrictive.

Among the problems with the Virginia law, officials said, was that it lacked more than one route for charter school applicants to appeal rejections. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charters Face Tough Rules: Advocates See Schools Too Restricted
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.