`Yuppie Flu' Funds Missing at CDC: Critics Say Fatigue as Disease Doubted

By Vanderkam, Laura R. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 7, 1999 | Go to article overview

`Yuppie Flu' Funds Missing at CDC: Critics Say Fatigue as Disease Doubted


Vanderkam, Laura R., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Federal researchers have blown $8.8 million - and misplaced another $4 million - set aside by Congress to study chronic fatigue syndrome.

Critics say the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention never took the disease seriously. In fact, they say the CDC merely paid lip service to the malady in testimony before Congress.

An inspector general's report found that more than half the $22.7 million appropriated by Congress in 1996 to study the disease was misspent. And a congressional subcommittee responsible for appropriating the funds wonders if Congress was misled on the money's use.

"CDC officials provided inaccurate and potentially misleading information to Congress concerning the scope and cost of chronic fatigue syndrome research activities," the audit report said in May.

In a complaint, Dr. William Reeves, a branch chief in the CDC's National Center for Infectious Diseases, accused Dr. Claire Broome, then-acting CDC director, of providing false information to Congress when she testified that part of the 1996 research money was spent on a new laboratory in Dr. Reeves' department. No such laboratory was built.

Dr. Reeves also said the division director, Dr. Brian Mahy, transferred funds from the CFS program to research areas he deemed more important.

Congress does not allocate funds based on the disease, according to sources on the House Appropriations Committee's subcommittee on labor, health and human services and education, but agencies are generally expected to follow congressional guidelines. In previous testimony, though, the subcommittee was told that the CFS research was continuing as planned.

Rep. John Edward Porter, Illinois Republican and chairman of the subcommittee, was "quite upset" about the allocation of funds.

"I have no problem if they had come back to us and said look, they don't think there is any good research we can follow here, this is not a good use of the money," Mr. Porter said. Mr. Porter, who has been on the subcommittee since the 1980s and was one of the first members of Congress to call for CFS research, expressed concern about the purported misappropriation of funds. He questioned if the CDC misrepresented its research plans to Congress.

"The CDC is a publicly funded institution of the government and it has to respond to some degree to the concerns of the people of this country and those people are represented in Congress," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

`Yuppie Flu' Funds Missing at CDC: Critics Say Fatigue as Disease Doubted
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.