Peters' Music Therapy: An Introduction (3Rd Ed.)

By Stretton-Smith, Phoebe, A. | Australian Journal of Music Therapy, Annual 2017 | Go to article overview

Peters' Music Therapy: An Introduction (3Rd Ed.)


Stretton-Smith, Phoebe, A., Australian Journal of Music Therapy


Lathom-Radocy, W. (2016). Peters' music therapy: An introduction (3rd ed.). Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.

AU $79.95, 792 pages (hard copy)

Peters' music therapy: An introduction is the third edition in a series of texts dedicated to providing a general introduction to music therapy, specifically outlining the scope of practice in the United States. This is the first edition written by Lathom-Radocy and the title acknowledges Jacqueline Schmid Peters who authored the first two editions (1987, 2000). Lathom-Radocy identifies her aims in writing this edition as updating the literature to include research and understandings developed since the second edition, as well as updating terminology to reflect the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (2013). The book is directed toward people with limited existing knowledge of the field, including students in introductory music therapy courses, professionals in related disciplines, people contemplating becoming music therapists, and the general public. As music therapy is taught at a Masters level in Australia, it could be used in the first six to twelve months of the course but may also be useful for students or current registered music therapists who are seeking a starting point to review or explore clinical practice in areas they have not worked before.

Peters' music therapy is divided into three key sections--part I and II are brief, while part III makes up the majority of the text. Part I offers a definition of music therapy and an overview of the education and training of music therapists in the United States. Part II moves from a historical overview of the use of music to promote health in different cultures, into the development of music therapy as an organised profession, again predominantly situated in the United States. Part III solidifies focus on the clinical practice of music therapy with an 'applied' rather than theoretical understanding of the field. It begins by providing fundamental background knowledge regarding principles and processes that guide music therapy practice, but is predominantly dedicated to describing music therapy with specific client populations. The first two chapters of part III outline a range of theoretical understandings as to why music is useful as a treatment modality and how music is used in therapy before taking the readers step-by-step through a treatment plan. These chapters may be useful for revision, or serve as a reference point for music therapy students when developing clinical positions and conducting educational in-services. This information is then specifically applied in the following fourteen chapters to different client groups, covering definitions, terminology and causes, as well as settings and the use of music in therapy. The book finishes by providing an overview of selected approaches, and highlighting the importance of research for music therapy clinicians.

The structure and clarity of previous editions is maintained in this latest edition of Peters' music therapy. Organisational and learning tools are used to enhance clarity and break up the information. Most useful are the 'questions for thought and discussion' concluding each chapter. Usually used as a teaching tool, these deepen engagement with the text and the field more broadly, and help the reader to reflect on the information and processes explored. The use of headings and sub-headings enhance the practicality and accessibility of the book, lending itself to individualised readings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Peters' Music Therapy: An Introduction (3Rd Ed.)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.