No Sugarcoating for `First Partner' Who Helped with the `Lies': Hillary Biography Details Her Connection to Chinese Cash

By Harper, Jennifer | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 20, 1999 | Go to article overview

No Sugarcoating for `First Partner' Who Helped with the `Lies': Hillary Biography Details Her Connection to Chinese Cash


Harper, Jennifer, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Biographies have followed Hillary Rodham Clinton around for years. There are 25 of them out there, ranging from crabby political tomes to prim accounts for young ladies.

Now comes one more. "The First Partner: Hillary Rodham Clinton" by historian Joyce Milton will be in bookstores tomorrow.

It has arresting moments. Miss Milton contends that the first lady hired detectives to tail her husband as early as the 1980s and later banned Barbra Streisand from overnight White House stays upon hearing that the chanteuse had dallied with the president.

The author names a dozen other presidential paramours and calls Mrs. Clinton a "connection" for various questionable campaign donations.

"I was surprised the entire time I was writing this book," Miss Milton said from her Brooklyn home yesterday. "Whenever something surfaced which I thought was merely some canard set forth by the Clintons' enemies, it turned out to be true."

The book sets the pace for Hillary bios to come.

Neither gush nor bash, it approaches the first lady as a canny media entity who gained insight even through the death of Princess Diana.

It "crystallized Hillary's appreciation of the power of celebrity. It was Diana's face on the cover of a thousand magazines, not her resume, that had been the source of her power."

"Mrs. Clinton is a practical kind of celebrity. She is a survivor," Miss Milton said.

The timing of this book - called "a revealing and withering portrait" by Publisher's Weekly - is beautiful. Mrs. Clinton is a valuable commodity these days: She's got buzz.

Only yesterday, she flirted with the great state of New York and affirmed her interest in its Senate race. Lists of potential campaign workers are already being crafted.

"I love New York," she told one happy audience.

The public likes her, the polls shine upon her - there is Hillary hunger in the air.

Miss Milton is already in the fast lane. Tomorrow, she'll be on NBC's "Today" show. William Morrow, her publisher, said they were "swamped" with interview requests.

The book itself is a complex and scrupulously documented odyssey, with 13 pages of footnotes.

Campaign finance gets a thorough going over. The author calls longtime Clinton ally John Huang "a spy" for either the Riady family or China; says his job at the Department of Commerce was courtesy of Mrs. Clinton herself.

The book offers detailed connections between Mrs. Clinton and Mark Jimenez, a campaign contributor now under indictment, the Riady family, Johnny Chung and government officials in Guam, among other places. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

No Sugarcoating for `First Partner' Who Helped with the `Lies': Hillary Biography Details Her Connection to Chinese Cash
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.