Pontiff Takes off for `One America': Will Visit Mexico before St. Louis

By Witham, Larry | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 22, 1999 | Go to article overview

Pontiff Takes off for `One America': Will Visit Mexico before St. Louis


Witham, Larry, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Pope John Paul II arrives in Mexico City today to begin a six-day visit to what he calls "one America," contiguous nations that together have the world's largest Catholic population.

The physically frail pontiff, who made the first of his 85 trips abroad in 1979 to Mexico, will spend his fourth visit there in Mexico City and on Tuesday fly to St. Louis for two days of public religious events.

The primary aim of the visit is to meet with the bishops of Latin America and North America and deliver a final message on their synod held a year ago in Rome, where they agreed that Mexico would be the best site for a ceremonial event.

"He is coming to meet the bishops of one America," said Mario Paredas, who will attend the Mexico events as director of the Northeast Hispanic Pastoral Center, which serves 4 million Hispanic Catholics in the United States.

"The church, in this synod, spoke of one America," he said. "The Holy Father in Mexico City will bring a new way of looking at the Catholic Church and her work in this hemisphere."

Based on the conclusions of the Rome synod of December 1997, the pope is likely to urge evangelization of the hemisphere, some forgiveness of the foreign debt in Latin America and opposition to drug trafficking.

The Rome synod also encouraged "immigrants who find yourself unwelcome in the lands where you have moved" - a likely papal topic after Tijuana Bishop Rafael Romo Munoz visited Rome this month, speaking of the 30 million transients in his state annually.

John Paul's visit today contrasts with 1979, when a vigorous Polish pope opened a meeting of the Latin American bishops with a warning against Marxist-inspired liberation theology.

While some accounts look back on that time in Mexico as an anti-clerical era when the 1917 Constitution still banned much public activity by the church, Mexican officials say there are similarities and differences.

"The public response was massive then, and it will be massive now," said Jose Antonio Zabalgoitia, information minister for the Embassy of Mexico. "At that time, we had not reformed our laws to a more modern relationship with churches and the Vatican, but it was much the same pattern."

In 1992, Mexico's Constitution was amended to give the Catholic church and Protestant groups legal standing, and the next year full diplomatic relations opened between Mexico and the Vatican.

On his 1990 visit, the pope beatified Juan Diego, the Indian whose vision of the Virgin of Guadeloupe gave the church - and even secular Mexico - its patron saint. And in 1993 he stopped in Mexico for a day en route to World Youth Day in Denver.

The Mexican capital today will celebrate the pope in new ways, perhaps most visible in the papal billboards erected by Pepsico and a media debate over commercializing the visit.

The Catholic Church in Mexico also has designated 25 companies as official sponsors to publicize the visit and defray the estimated $1.2 million cost to the local church.

Some editorials and consumer groups have decried the papal kitsch. Others critics said it is bad taste at a time of economic austerity and in light of papal statements about the poor being "excluded from the banquet of everyday consumerism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pontiff Takes off for `One America': Will Visit Mexico before St. Louis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.