The Return of David Duke

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 2, 1999 | Go to article overview

The Return of David Duke


Tim Russert did the nation a service Sunday morning by putting congressional hopeful David Duke on display. Smarmy and smug, Mr. Duke tried to deflect Mr. Russerts' aggressive questioning by making himself out to be a screwy sort of pacifist - the sort who is so upset about collateral civilian casualties in wartime Germany that he concludes American flyers were murderers on a scale far worse than Timothy McVeigh.

Mr. Duke may not be walking around with a swastika on his arm anymore, but that doesn't mean he has given up his fascist affections. There is the taste for Holocaust revisionism, and the fact that Mr. Duke is still fond of swastikas, albeit the modernized version. Log onto Mr. Duke's internet site, and the first thing one is confronted with is a peculiar and disturbing symbol: a large circle with cross-hairs. It is the white supremacist version of a swastika, the same logo used by the hate group "Stormfront" - to whose web site Mr. Duke also provides a helpful link.

Mr. Duke is running for the House seat recently vacated by Louisiana Republican Robert Livingston, on a message of "white pride." Not that he thinks there are enough white supremacists in the district to carry the day for him - Mr. Duke still plays his old game of dressing up like a conservative Republican. The David Duke platform starts with a "No New Taxes!" pledge and calls for abolishing the IRS before moving on to the racial hot buttons. Even with those issues Mr. Duke attempts to portray himself as a sort of mainstream conservative whose opposition to affirmative action flows from a principled opposition to racial discrimination. As he has done before, Mr. Duke is trying to hijack the legitimate conservative agenda. If the substance of Mr. Duke's views weren't enough to energize opposition from conservatives, they should consider the damage Mr. Duke promises to do to conservative causes.

Consider Mr. Duke's efforts to make Charlton Heston into his poster boy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Return of David Duke
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.