Effort Starts in U.S., France to Restore Versailles Treasure

By Chaffee, Kevin | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 27, 1999 | Go to article overview

Effort Starts in U.S., France to Restore Versailles Treasure


Chaffee, Kevin, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Plans for one of the grandest - and most expensive - fund-raising galas in history were announced Friday afternoon by the American Friends of Versailles at the residence of French Ambassador Francois Bujon de l'Estang and his wife, Anne.

About 40 likely prospects were invited for a sumptuous lunch to hear details of the glamorous four-day affair, to be held June 24 through 27 at Versailles and other sites in and around Paris, including the Elysee Palace, the residence of U.S. Ambassador Felix Rohatyn and various private chateaux and hotels particuliers of note.

Prices range from a minimum $10,000 per couple to $500,000 and $1 million "opportunities" to attend a great ball and fireworks display at the Grand Trianon plus a dizzying number of lunches, receptions, dinners, picnics, special tours and programs being organized by the American group under the auspices of its parent organization, Les Amis de Versailles, and the French government.

Guests admitted the sales pitch was difficult to resist, especially after a few glasses of vintage champagne in the residence's appropriately palatial Salon Rouge and a low-key presentation delivered with great aplomb by the president of Les Amis de Versailles, the Vicomte de Rohan.

The Rohans, it should be noted, are among France's greatest noble families, with countless dukes, princes and prelates (including eight cardinals) who played major roles not only at Versailles, but throughout European history for more than 800 years.

"Our government does a lot, but when something new must be done, private funds are needed," the vicomte said, aristocratically rapping his tortoise-shell glasses on a screen as a nervous embassy projectionist tried to keep up with slides illustrating his commentary on the Trois Fontaines Bosquet, one of the palace's most beautiful outdoor treasures.

Funds raised by the American Friends during the gala week will be earmarked for restoration of the vast rectangular bosquet, or grove, designed by master architect Andre Le Notre between 1671 and 1679 at the height of Sun King Louis XIV's reign. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Effort Starts in U.S., France to Restore Versailles Treasure
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.