Nobel Laureate `Uncle' to Local Tot: Tutu Visits Godson Desmond's School

By Hyslop, Margie | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 15, 1999 | Go to article overview

Nobel Laureate `Uncle' to Local Tot: Tutu Visits Godson Desmond's School


Hyslop, Margie, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


When Cedar Grove Elementary School's principal said Desmond Douglas' "Uncle" Desmond could visit the kindergartner's class, he and the students got a surprise.

"We found out who `Uncle Desmond' was," Principal Eric Mills told an audience packed into the school's gymnasium yesterday to hear South African Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

The 1984 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to bring a peaceful end to white-minority rule in South Africa came to the school between Germantown and Damascus to visit his godson - whose mother, Kelly Douglas , met the archbishop about 20 years ago when she was a theology student.

Under a rainbow of pastel-colored paper dolls arching a platform in the school gym, Archbishop Tutu watched as first- through fifth-graders recited poems and sang about helping, caring and world peace.

After complimenting the students, he asked the boys, then the girls the seemingly mundane question: "Do you have girlfriends [boyfriends]?"

"No," came the resounding replies.

Then he told a story about a boy who saw a man on a street corner holding red, white, green and black balloons.

"Now and again this man would let go of a balloon and the boy would see red, white, black . . . balloons float to the sky," Archbishop Tutu said.

" `Excuse me sir, how come when you let go of the red, white, black balloons they float into the sky?' " the boy asked.

"He said: `It's not the color of the balloon that matters, it's the stuff inside. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nobel Laureate `Uncle' to Local Tot: Tutu Visits Godson Desmond's School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.