Credit Card Customers Seek More Value from Their Plastic

By Marriott, Anne | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 10, 1997 | Go to article overview

Credit Card Customers Seek More Value from Their Plastic


Marriott, Anne, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


It's that time of year again when retailers' fancy turns to consumers with shopping bags under their arms and credit cards falling out of their pockets. And while holiday spending is expected to increase only modestly over last year, that still means shoppers will drop about $750 apiece on gifts.

According to a study recently released by MasterCard International, 54 percent of the consumers surveyed said they are more likely to use a credit card to finance their holiday purchases if the plastic offers them in-store discounts.

Forty percent said they would be more likely to use credit if they received a rebate with their statement, 40 percent said they would if they had a purchase protection plan, and 21 percent said they would if they could get better seats at events.

"Consumers are looking for value in their cards," said Charlotte Newton, a MasterCard vice president in the Washington office. "That's the mantra for consumers today, getting value for the various payment products out there."

So staying ahead of the competition in an industry where there are thousands of card issuers in the United States alone requires that issuers stay abreast of the changing whims of consumers, she said.

BEYOND DRIVE-THROUGHS

The key to staying ahead of the curve in the competitive financial services industry these days is to give customers what they want. And for Citibank customers, that means constantly upgrading their computer banking.

"People are looking for convenience more and more," said Nevine Loutfy, the marketplace sales director for Citibank. "It's the evolution of society - they want to be able to bank in their living room, den and study."

Two weeks ago the bank, which has a large presence in the Washington area, introduced its new Direct Access on-line banking services. While many banks offer clients access to computer banks, Citibank wants to stay a step ahead.

Besides being able to keep up with the checking account and pay bills electronically, customers will be able to buy stocks and mutual funds in real time and post questions for various service departments within the bank.

But the real advantage of the new service has absolutely nothing to do with any of the icons on the screen. By putting the program on the Internet rather than sending out individual discs, the bank can also update the program whenever it wants without causing a major disruption for its customers.

"Citibank introduced the public to [automatic teller machines] 20 years ago," Ms. Loutfy said. "And we want to continue to be pioneers."

A NEW ACCOUNT

First Virginia Bank Inc. of Falls Church announced the first set of winners of its annual student art calendar contest last week, giving the top prize to Jessica Thompson, a senior at Osbourn Park High School in Manassas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Credit Card Customers Seek More Value from Their Plastic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.