Black Conservative PAC Celebrates Growing Appeal of Family Values

By Harper, Jennifer | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 25, 1997 | Go to article overview

Black Conservative PAC Celebrates Growing Appeal of Family Values


Harper, Jennifer, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Black conservatives last night affirmed the traditional values based on faith, character and self-reliance.

At its biannual awards dinner, Black America's Political Action Committee (BAMPAC) celebrated its solidarity, leadership and a public response that has surprised even director Alvin Williams.

"We promote renewed reverence for God and country, a belief that human life is sacred, a commitment to strong families and communities and a respect for excellence in education," he said. These values have "served the black community throughout history."

"Our mission is about educating people. It's about bringing new people into the fold," Mr. Williams said. "And it's really taken off."

The group, founded four years ago by former Republican presidential candidate Alan Keyes, has tripled in size each year and now counts 43,000 members nationwide. Last year they raised funds for 10 political candidates in nine states.

Membership includes blacks, Hispanics and whites. The group does not have a separatist agenda, Mr. Williams said.

Last night's dinner speakers included Republican National Committee Chairman Jim Nicholson and Rep. J.C. Watts, Oklahoma Republican, who received one of eight awards the group gave for political and civic leadership.

Among the other honorees were Rep. Floyd H. Flake, New York Democrat; Ward Connerly, a businessman who led the fight for Proposition 209, a California ballot initiative to dismantle affirmative action; the Rev. Earl Jackson of the Samaritan Project; and Alveda King of Putting Kids First.

James E. Johnson received the Lifetime of Leadership Award for a career in the military, business and politics that spans decades. …

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