U.S. and Sweden Have Long History

By Goff, Karen Goldberg | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 22, 1997 | Go to article overview

U.S. and Sweden Have Long History


Goff, Karen Goldberg, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The 4-1 victory over Australia in the Davis Cup semifinals sets the Americans up for a meeting with another old foe, Sweden, in Gothenburg, Sweden, in November.

The United States has played Sweden nine times in the Davis Cup and leads 7-2. The previous time the two countries met in the final was on clay in 1984. In that tie, Sweden, which featured Mats Wilander and Stefan Edberg at the peak of their careers, won the Cup 4-1, defeating a U.S. team with John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors.

Since then, the past three meetings have been in the semifinals on clay, carpet and hardcourts.

The Americans won the 1992 and '95 meetings, both in the United States, and lost in Sweden in '94 after blowing a 2-0 lead.

In 1994, Pete Sampras and Todd Martin each won the first-day singles matches in four sets. Jared Palmer and Jonathan Stark teamed for doubles and lost in four sets. Sampras was forced to retire in the second set against Stefan Edberg with an ankle injury; it was the last time he lost a Davis Cup singles match. The tie came down to Martin, but he lost to Magnus Larsson in four sets.

In 1995, Martin, Sampras and Andre Agassi were on the team that won 4-1. The United States went on to beat Russia in the final.

"I don't know who they are going to play," said Sampras. "So it is pretty hard for me to comment on the match. They are most likely going to play [Jonas] Bjorkman and Larsson and [Thomas] Enqvist on an indoor court that will probably be pretty quick."

U.S. team captain Tom Gullikson will name the team as the Nov. 28-30 finals approach.

"The doubles are still a question mark," said Gullikson. "This year we have won all 12 of our singles matches. We have the No. 1 and 2 players in the world - we'll certainly take our chances with Michael [Chang] and Pete [Sampras]. We've got to come up with something in doubles. …

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