Most Timely Addition to Culpeper Scene: It's about Thyme for Stylish Accent on Flavorful Fare

By Rosson, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

Most Timely Addition to Culpeper Scene: It's about Thyme for Stylish Accent on Flavorful Fare


Rosson, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


I fancy this little restaurant not because it takes me back almost to my infancy in Virginia, though that's part of the tale, but because it's the first totally promising restaurant to hit Culpeper, Va., in years. Maybe decades.

It's called It's About Thyme, and for Culpeper it is about time.

Compared with some of its equally history-laden neighbors - Fredericksburg, Warrenton and Little Washington come to mind - Culpeper has been the laggard on historic preservation.

More's the pity, and that could explain why some of the perks often resulting from "old town" preservation - good restaurants being one of them - have seldom made their presence felt there, if ever.

But Culpeper is changing. And It's About Thyme - open since November - is shaping up as a hit. It isn't exactly packed (though I have seen it nearly that way), but at any given hour it can be a very busy little place. Clearly it's a restaurant the locals like, and that can spell staying power.

The reasons for its following are clear. The food is stylish, with an emphasis on Italian, Greek and American accents; the ingredients are fresh and inordinately flavorful; the ambience is cultured but not stuffy; and the locally trained staff, though it doesn't always succeed, tries mightily to keep up with the pressure.

Finally, the price is right - lunch about $9 and dinner $16 to $20, with plenty of openings to dine both lightly and for less.

Meanwhile, the setting is something else - for me, at least.

Until I entered It's About Thyme a few weeks ago, I had not set foot in that small storefront in more than 50 years - not since I was the 12-year-old paperboy delivering the Richmond News Leader to the building's Depression-era occupant, Deckelman's Ready to Wear, one of numerous stores strung along East Davis Street.

I can still see Deckelman's and its neighbors in their 1930s and '40s guises - among them the Sanitary Grocery, the J.J. Newberry's five-and-dime and Knackal's Bakery, all subscribers to the News Leader. Of that list, only Knackal's still exists.

Today, the old Deckelman's flooring is polished, the walls are splashed with a flamboyant artist's depictions of sunny Mediterranean villas, the tables are dressed with fresh flowers, and the old pressed-tin ceiling, while newly painted, really is the old Deckelman's ceiling.

The rear of the room is devoted to another eye-catcher: It's About Thyme owner John Yarnall's slickly mounted, chalk-white pizza oven, its small, upscale pies styled for grown-ups rather than kids.

Put briefly, It's About Thyme is a restaurant first, but it's also a snappy, 60-seat cafe.

Mr. Yarnall, 47, is a native of Swarthmore, Pa., and for 13 years he owned and operated a restaurant in Media, Pa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Most Timely Addition to Culpeper Scene: It's about Thyme for Stylish Accent on Flavorful Fare
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.