Use Laws, Not Amendment, Religious Groups Urge Hill

By Witham, Larry | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 15, 1997 | Go to article overview

Use Laws, Not Amendment, Religious Groups Urge Hill


Witham, Larry, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Congress yesterday began considering ways to undo last month's Supreme Court ruling striking down a 1993 religious freedom law, an act the justices condemned as an abuse of power by the legislative branch.

But the witnesses at a House hearing yesterday weren't recommending that Congress fight back with an amendment to the Constitution.

Lawyers and scholars from several faiths instead said Congress should pass new laws, relying on its power to regulate interstate commerce and the Constitution's "necessary and proper" clause, to limit the states' ability to regulate and restrict religious practices.

A lawyer for the state of Ohio, which supported the Supreme Court's ruling, told the House Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution that Ohio is fashioning a law like the struck-down federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, that meets the state's needs, such as excluding prisoners from its protection.

"It would appear . . . that RFRA is still valid as to the federal government," said Rep. Charles T. Canady, Florida Republican and subcommittee chairman.

He noted, however, that the Supreme Court directed a lower court to review a federal case in light of its ruling that RFRA is invalid for individual states.

"If the federal component of RFRA is struck down, I believe Congress would be well within its authority to enact legislation that instructs federal agencies to accommodate religious practices that are substantially burdened by government's actions," Mr. Canady said.

Congress passed and President Clinton signed RFRA in 1993 after the high court ruled in 1990 that a state government does not need to show a "compelling interest" to justify general laws that may restrict sincerely held religious beliefs and expressions.

A Catholic parish in Texas used RFRA to fight a city zoning decision that it could not expand its historic sanctuary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Use Laws, Not Amendment, Religious Groups Urge Hill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.