Mrs. Albright Is No Scapegoat

By Beichman, Arnold | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

Mrs. Albright Is No Scapegoat


Beichman, Arnold, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Every Jew, observant or non-observant over the age of 60, knows that had he been living before 1945 in Western or Eastern Europe, he and his family would most likely have been butchered in Hitler's death camps. That judgment I am sure includes Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright whose life was saved by her parents' foresight in getting out of Czechoslovakia and converting to Catholicism.

What Jewish parents, had they been able to do so, would not have acted in the same manner to save themselves and their babies?

There are now some mutterings that Mrs. Albright tried to hide her ethnic origin by ignoring letters from Czech officials informing her that her parents were Jews by origin. Whether or not she disregarded these letters, I find it hard to see what she is supposedly guilty of. Hitler's Holocaust forced Jews, hunted everywhere in Europe to do anything they could, even religious conversion, to save their lives and the lives of their loved ones. There is an honorable tradition to such voluntary conversion. The Marranos, Spanish Jews, were faced with torture and death by the Inquisition, and they converted. Some stayed Christian, others practiced Judaism in secret. Who would condemn them?

The people who are to be condemned are the Allied statesmen who knew what was going on in the Nazi death camps and did nothing to rescue these millions of innocent victims. President Roosevelt and the State Department knew and did nothing. Prime Minister Churchill and the British Foreign Office knew and did nothing. While the Allies were silent, with the honorable exceptions of Denmark and perhaps Holland, millions of men, women and children were exterminated and turned into a skeletal rubble (minus their gold fillings). Blame the French collaborationists for the tens of thousands of Jews their police rounded up for deportation to the Nazis death camps. …

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