The Catholic Church and the Media

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 20, 1996 | Go to article overview

The Catholic Church and the Media


Bishop Fabian Bruskewitz of Lincoln, Neb., is sticking to his guns, excommunicating members of his flock who insist on remaining members of organizations that the bishop deems "perilous" to the Catholic Church.

Given the tone and tenor of the news coverage, you would think that the bishop had done something unconstitutional, had somehow violated the civil rights of his parishioners. Whatever happened to freedom of association? What about protests based in conscience? How dare the Catholic Church interfere in the beliefs of its members. These are the sort of outraged utterances coming from the elite media, who feign an interest in seeing the church flourish - that is, if the church will get with the times and nix the reactionary mumbo-jumbo.

Among the groups declared inconsistent with church teaching are Planned Parenthood, Call to Action, the Hemlock Society and the Masons. Because Freemasonry is not particularly important to most liberal journalists, very little of their outrage has been expended defending the rights of Masons. But Call to Action is another matter altogether. The group is made up of liberal Catholics who disagree with Catholic Church teachings, for example the insistence that only unmarried men should be priests. Members of Call to Action get very sympathetic coverage, which should come as no surprise: Their politically correct views resonate powerfully with the PC values of the elite press. So, too, members of Planned Parenthood are on the side of the media angels: For many liberal pressies, abortion is a choice that should never be interfered with, not by government edict, and not even by the simple moral censure of a church.

The media coverage has the same hollow ring to be found in all those articles urging the Republican Party to save itself by becoming a big pro-choice, homosexual-friendly tent. …

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