Fishery Scientists Speak out on the Issue of Animal Rights

By Mueller, Gene | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 13, 1996 | Go to article overview

Fishery Scientists Speak out on the Issue of Animal Rights


Mueller, Gene, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The fisheries side of the scientific community is weighing in on the touchy subject of animal rights and, wonder of wonders, it doesn't mince words. I say that because biologists occasionally speak in a long, drawn-out style that can be compared with asking someone for the time of day only to be told in 10,000 words or more how to build a clock.

Yet here is the Bethesda-based American Fisheries Society (AFS) - an international non-profit organization of fishing professionals (70 percent of the membership consists of state and federal government biologists) - with a draft policy statement concerning the animal rights movement and how it might affect the orderly work performance of fisheries biologists. It wastes little time scoring a point or two.

In the February issue of Fisheries, the official monthly journal of the AFS, Joseph F. Webb and Donald C. Jackson provide an "Issue Definition" that begins, "Individual animal `rights' advocates and organizations have objectives that differ greatly from, and are at odds with, the objectives of the American Fisheries Society. [Our objectives] are to promote the conservation, development and wise use of fisheries. Philosophies holding that animals are not to be used by humans and that wildlife (including fish) should not be managed, are increasingly affecting fish and wildlife population management . . .

"When public policy issues affecting fish management arise, animal rights advocates oppose the consumptive uses of fish as well as the management of fishery resources and their habitats. Opposition to consumptive use of fish and wildlife has been blocked both by lawful and unlawful interference. Sophisticated tactics are used to delay management of fish and wildlife populations."

What the American Fisheries Society refers to here is the various methods used by the animal religionists, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the Humane Society of the U.S., the Friends of Animals, and other far-out groups that are tiny in number but gargantuan in the vocal department. These animal worshippers would dictate to the scientific community what it should and should not do, but happily they haven't gotten very far in that regard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Fishery Scientists Speak out on the Issue of Animal Rights
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.