Of Assault Weapons, Gun Control and the Second Amendment

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 7, 1996 | Go to article overview

Of Assault Weapons, Gun Control and the Second Amendment


Henrik Bering posits that there is no real need for a citizen to own an assault rifle and that conservatives should be in support of the "assault weapon" ban. Mr. Bering has, however, overlooked some critical facts concerning the debate among conservatives concerning the ban.

He states that "there really is no pressing reason why ordinary citizens should have access to assault weapons." Perhaps Mr. Bering has failed to adequately explore this issue. Take for instance the 1992 Los Angeles riots, where Korean-American store owners successfully defended their businesses from mob violence by bearing these same "assault" weapons that Mr. Bering objects to. With violence and crime on the rise, citizens should have access to adequate personal protection. Using a six-shooter against a mob is hardly what one might consider adequate.

Mr. Bering also expresses dismay in regard to conservative opposition to waiting periods and "one gun a month" laws. I would care to point out that numerous cases exist where waiting periods left people with desperate need for protection defenseless at crucial moments, sometimes resulting in terrible murders while the victims were waiting for a background check to be completed. In more general terms, Mr. Bering's disdain for opposition to "common-sense" laws such as these hearkens to a view that rights are restrictable or malleable if society's elite deems them so. The Second Amendment states that the right of the people to keep and bear arms "shall not be infringed." I would describe gun rationing and waiting periods as an infringement.

He also asserts that the assault weapons ban covers 19 weapons. As Gun Owners of America and several other groups have pointed out, this is untrue. In fact, 180 guns, includng even the old 1860-model Winchester repeating rifle (hardly an "assault weapon" by anyone's standards) are affected by the ban. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Of Assault Weapons, Gun Control and the Second Amendment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.