News of `Murrow' Book Is Good

By Geracimos, Ann | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 5, 1996 | Go to article overview

News of `Murrow' Book Is Good


Geracimos, Ann, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The handsome, craggy face, the furrowed brow, a cigarette angled just so over a typewriter. Who else could it be but Edward R. Murrow - that legend-in-his-own-time who brought World War II home to America in the most penetrating way, pioneering almost single-handedly the field of broadcast news?

But what of the rest of his hand-picked team of 11 talented, on-the-spot reporters known as "The Murrow Boys"? Their story is told in a newly published book by the same name, written by Stanley Cloud and Lynne Olson, a local husband-and-wife team with distinguished journalism careers of their own.

Only Mr. Murrow is featured on the cover of the book, but in writing a thoroughly winning account of the famous CBS correspondents' experiences, the authors sought to rescue from partial oblivion at least two members of the late Mr. Murrow's team.

Enter Washingtonians Mary Marvin Breckinridge Patterson and Larry LeSeueur, two of the four team members still living. (The other two are Howard K. Smith, at home in Bethesda with pneumonia, and Richard C. Hottelet, who lives in Connecticut and couldn't make it down.) They were were hailed warmly Monday at a party given by Murray Gart and his wife, Jeanne, for Mr. Cloud and Miss Olson in the Cosmos Club attended by dozens of luminaries from the journalism world.

Mrs. Patterson, a feisty pioneer in a wheelchair known locally as a grande dame of worthy causes, was the first and only woman hired by Mr. Murrow out of London to report from Amsterdam and Paris prior to the start of the war. How did she like being "a Murrow girl"? she was asked.

"I like being one of the Murrow boys," she shot back. She left broadcasting in 1940 -forced out at the time of her marriage to wealthy State Department diplomat Jefferson Patterson. The late broadcaster's widow, Janet Murrow, stays with Mrs. Patterson when visiting Washington. …

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