Communicating Your Library's Mission: A Paper about Bibliometrics and a New Column about Careers Complement a Variety of Perspectives on Developing a Mission Statement and Sharing It with Stakeholders

By Hales, Stuart | Information Outlook, September-October 2018 | Go to article overview

Communicating Your Library's Mission: A Paper about Bibliometrics and a New Column about Careers Complement a Variety of Perspectives on Developing a Mission Statement and Sharing It with Stakeholders


Hales, Stuart, Information Outlook


Does your library or information center have a mission, and do you know what it is? Could you recite it if your boss called you into his or her office? How did you develop it, and do your work and attitude reflect it? And do you channel Jurassic Park when trying to communicate it to stakeholders?

These are just some of the questions raised and addressed in this issue of Information Outlook, which contains perspectives on library missions from librarians as well as from a marketing and communications specialist, a "thrivability" consultant and a pastor. Be sure to read Heather Kotula's argument for incorporating return on investment into your library's mission statement and Brian McCann's analysis of why Jurassic Park Should guide your approach to communicating your mission.

This issue also features an interview with SLA members Susan Makar and Amy Trost, the authors of the best contributed paper presented at tile SLA 2018 Annual Conference. If you thought bibliometrics was just for counting citations and calculating the impact of research, read their paper and learn how they used bibliometrics to provide quantitative analysis.

The content in this issue reflects SLA 2018 in another way--a new column. "Info Careers," in which SLA members will share their career lessons and advice. This new column resulted from a session at SLA 2018 hosted by the Information Outlook Advisory Council (IOAC) titled "Ask Us Anything: Contributing to Your Professional Magazine, Information Outlook." Session attendees shared their concerns and suggestions with IOAC members, and one of the latter was a desire for a column devoted to career advice and experiences. Tom Nielsen kicks off this column with a reflection on career success and an insight into defining success in ways that reflect your unique skills and circumstances.

What other insights can you glean from this issue? Consider the following:

"Like the organizations they serve, many libraries and information centers have mission statements. But what if they had mission questions instead of mission statements? How much more engaging and inviting would this be than the typical bland pronouncements about 'providing resources and services'? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Communicating Your Library's Mission: A Paper about Bibliometrics and a New Column about Careers Complement a Variety of Perspectives on Developing a Mission Statement and Sharing It with Stakeholders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.