Fatal Infections Ravage Aging U.S. Population: Global Onslaught of Disease Feared

By Price, Joyce | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 17, 1996 | Go to article overview

Fatal Infections Ravage Aging U.S. Population: Global Onslaught of Disease Feared


Price, Joyce, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Deaths from infectious disease have climbed rapidly since 1980 to become the third-leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer, a new report says.

The report, in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association, indicates the limitations of antibiotics and new global vulnerability to infectious disease.

"We have created the perfect world for the bugs to take over," Nobel laureate Joshua Lederberg, an expert in infectious diseases, told United Press International.

In an editorial, Dr. Margaret A. Winkler, senior JAMA editor, and Associate Editor Annette Flanagin noted that a little more than a decade ago "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine" proclaimed that "infectious diseases are more easily prevented and more easily cured than any other major group of disorders."

They said this complacency caused the medical community to focus more on heart disease and cancer. "In 1996, we view infectious diseases with a humbler eye," they wrote.

"The victories of a quarter-century ago ring hollow as AIDS ravages, enterococci [a bacterial strain] become resistant to all standard treatments, and the once easily treated pneumococcus gains a plethora of antimicrobial drug resistance."

They added that the war against infectious diseases requires a global approach.

Based on a review of death certificates, the report found that deaths from infectious diseases in the United States rose 58 percent, from 41 to 65 deaths per 100,000 population, between 1980 and 1992.

AIDS cases, unknown in 1980, accounted for the largest share of the increase. Even without AIDS, the "death rate due to infectious diseases . . . increased by 22 percent," wrote Dr. Robert W. Pinner, an epidemiologist for the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the primary author of the report.

Dr. Leon Smith, president of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, predicts infectious diseases will be the No. 2 killer, after cancer, in another five to 10 years. "Heart disease is really under control," he said in an interview.

Infectious-disease deaths will continue to rise, he said, because of the aging population, increasingly resistant microbes, inadequate levels of immunization, greater numbers of people with suppressed immune systems as a result of organ transplants and chemotherapy, and a "drought of new antibiotics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fatal Infections Ravage Aging U.S. Population: Global Onslaught of Disease Feared
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.