Benjamin F. Holeman, 76, N.Y. Daily News Veteran

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 27, 1996 | Go to article overview

Benjamin F. Holeman, 76, N.Y. Daily News Veteran


S=NEW STORY

Benjamin F. Holeman, 76, N.Y. Daily News veteran

Benjamin F. "Frank" Holeman, 76, a former newspaperman whose 27-year career at the New York Daily News spanned everything from copyboy to executive editor, died of a heart attack Sept. 23 at Vencor Hospital in Arlington. He was a longtime resident of Falls Church.

Known among his colleagues as "The Colonel" for his Southern manners, Mr. Holeman, at 6 feet 7 inches tall with a deep voice and ever-present bow tie and cigar, was considered to be a walking archive because of his almost total recall of events.

The Raleigh, N.C., native broke into the news business in March 1941 at the Daily News and rose through the ranks so fast that after one year he was sent to the Washington bureau.

He spent 20 years covering the White House, Congress, defense, labor, courts, science, foreign affairs and politics as a reporter and bureau chief.

In 1956 he was voted president of the National Press Club.

"Incorporate in your inaugural address a section explaining in detail how you managed to be unopposed in your presidential campaign," quipped President Eisenhower in a letter congratulating Mr. Holeman on his success.

Mr. Holeman also covered national political conventions from 1948 to 1964. He accompanied President Truman to Brazil, President Eisenhower to Canada, and President Kennedy to Mexico and Australia.

The only break from his work at the Daily News came in 1943, when he served in the Army for three years with the Counter Intelligence Corps.

His duties took him to Australia, Bougainville, Luzon and Japan during World War II. He was awarded a Bronze Star for meritorious achievement and discharged as a technical sergeant with the 214th C.I.C. Detachment, Headquarters XIV Corps. …

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