In South Africa, the Truth and Nothing But

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

In South Africa, the Truth and Nothing But


The truth shall make you free, so John quotes Jesus. Well, nowhere is that more true than right now in South Africa, where the men who worked in the police force and for the security services, during apartheid, are being offered amnesty for their confessions. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established by Nelson Mandela's government in order that apartheid's dark history could be told, ultimately - it was hoped - leading to healing and reconciliation for the country. But that high ideal is tougher to live with than it seems. The men who killed some of the most famous anti-Apartheid activists are now coming forward to tell their stories, and the families of the victims feel cheated.

Steve Biko died while in police custody in 1977. Medical records indicate that a massive brain hemorrhage was the cause of death, but a clear picture of what killed Biko has never fully emerged. Now, police officers who years ago had denied that Biko received any beatings at all are coming forward telling the commission a very different story - the whole truth in return for complete amnesty. Steve Biko's widow and his family find the situation unacceptable. Last year they went to court claiming that amnesty would prevent there ever being a criminal trial in his death. But the South African Supreme Court ruled in favor of the commission. At a news conference last week, commission Deputy Chairman Alex Boraine told reporters, "members of the former security branch acknowledge responsibility for assaults on Stephen Bantu Biko ... in September 1977 ... and the killing of Mr. Biko." But that knowledge is all the comfort his family will get.

The confessions in relation to Biko's death, along with others concerning the deaths of other well-known activists, such as Matthew Goniwe, Nomonde Calata, Sparrow Mkhonto and Sicelo Mhalwuli - otherwise known as the Craddock Four - mark a huge victory for the Truth Commission, which is headed by Bishop Desmond Tutu. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In South Africa, the Truth and Nothing But
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.