Rodman's Too Bad to Get Back on Court

By Washington, Adrienne T. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

Rodman's Too Bad to Get Back on Court


Washington, Adrienne T., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


"Bad As I Wanna Be" is no good - not for children, not for adults and certainly not for superstars, as Dennis "The Menace to Society" Rodman may eventually find out.

Sorry, Jesse, but Dennis and dignity won't meet again on many a score card.

Not after he donned a white wedding gown. Not after he kissed drag queen RuPaul on the mouth on late-night cablevision. Not after he angrily kicked a cameraman in the groin Jan. 15 for no apparent reason in Minneapolis.

Folks are finally getting fed up to their rainbow-colored hairlines with the unacceptable antics of highly paid, highly pampered stars and athletes who think their elevated status gives them the license to engage in all manner of despicable shenanigans.

Slapped with an 11-game suspension, a $25,000 fine and a $200,000

out-of-court settlement to Eugene Amos, the Bad Boy of Basketball now promises to act like the irreverent Hollywood angel "Michael." He's hankering to get back to hogging hoops and butting heads so he can get back to making mo' money.

Miki Turner, a friend and a free-lance writer covering sports and entertainment in Los Angeles, maintains that Rodman is no wacky psycho. Nor is he an undisciplined urchin. This shrewd showman makes a calculated business decision each time he opts to be outrageous in an attempt to grab headlines as well as rebounds.

"He knows better than anybody that a boring Dennis Rodman won't make any money," Ms. Turner says.

And boring he can be. She's seen the Menace parade before cameras and fans dressed in pink hush puppies, purple velvet pants, a lime-green shirt and flaming red hair, then invariably seclude himself in a locker room corner reading a book and wearing pajamas.

Can you believe it? Wonder if they were Winnie the Pooh or Yogi Bear PJs?

Forget the league-imposed psychiatric counseling that the Bad Boy initially wanted the Rev. Jesse Jackson to do. "A basically good person with a bad temper," as Jesse contends? Not judging from his past histrionics.

Rodman is a menace to society and to himself because he chooses to be, because he buys that peculiar American ticket that making mo' money at all cost - even to your personhood, your pride and your people - is worth the risk to all.

As early as today, NBA Commissioner David Stern will decide whether Rodman can return to the Chicago Bulls after the All-Star break. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rodman's Too Bad to Get Back on Court
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.