The Government of Sudan Is Engaged in a War against Terrorism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 2, 1997 | Go to article overview

The Government of Sudan Is Engaged in a War against Terrorism


Glaring errors are legion in two of last week's Washington Times news reports on the current aggression against the Republic of Sudan by Ethiopia and Eritrea to assist the belligerence of Sudanese rebel John Garang ("Sudan seeks U.N. aid as rebels advance"; "Bashir forces use hunger, fire to control rebel areas," Jan. 16).

The government of Sudan has neither burned villages nor stooped to the politics of hunger in fighting Mr. Garang's terrorist forces. It is he who has kidnapped 25,000 children for training as soldiers in Cuba and elsewhere. He also has practiced scorched-earth warfare.

The Sudanese civil war does not pit north against south. A majority in the Sudanese military are southerners, and eight rebel leaders in the south (all but Mr. Garang) have signed a peace accord with the Sudanese government. Neither does the war pit Muslims against Christians. Christians are 5 percent of the Sudan's entire population and make up 17 percent of its southern population, in contrast to 18 percent Muslim and 65 percent animist in the south.

The vice president and deputy speaker of the National Assembly are Christians, and churches and Christian schools flourish throughout the country. Muslim sharla law has no application in the 10 southern states or to Christians living in the north. The civil war does not pit black Africans against Arab Africans. …

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The Government of Sudan Is Engaged in a War against Terrorism
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