Cuba Searched Diplomatic Pouch, Won U.S. Apology: State Department Failed to Protest Violation of Protocol

By Carter, Tom | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 21, 1997 | Go to article overview

Cuba Searched Diplomatic Pouch, Won U.S. Apology: State Department Failed to Protest Violation of Protocol


Carter, Tom, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The Cuban government last month searched the contents of a U.S. diplomatic pouch destined for the U.S. Interest Section in Havana in violation of all normal procedures, according to sources on Capitol Hill and in the Clinton administration.

Far from hiding its behavior, the sources said, Havana protested to the State Department over publications it found in the pouch intended for Cuban dissidents. The Clinton administration, rather than protest the opening of the pouch, apologized to Cuba for the publications.

The State Department's Cuba desk officer, Michael Rannenberger, said yesterday he could not respond to the allegations because the situation was "too complex."

But, at a luncheon for the Freedom House Congressional Task Force on Cuba, he refused to deny the incident took place.

Others at the meeting were less secretive.

"Yes, the Cubans messed with one of our pouches," said David Evans, Cuba program officer at the U.S. Information Agency. He refused to divulge any details.

According to several people, a 40-pound box containing a variety of human rights publications was pilfered on entry into Cuba. Cuban officials discovered the "subversive" literature and filed a protest with the State Department.

The Cuban government claimed in its protest that the pouch lacked the proper seals and that the contents spilled out in front of officials, who then reviewed them.

"The Clinton administration responded in effect by saying, `Oops, we're sorry. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cuba Searched Diplomatic Pouch, Won U.S. Apology: State Department Failed to Protest Violation of Protocol
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.