U.S. Offers $600 Million to Clear Debt to Asian Bank: Offer Part of Clinton Push for Increase in Foreign Aid

By Witter, Willis | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 18, 1997 | Go to article overview

U.S. Offers $600 Million to Clear Debt to Asian Bank: Offer Part of Clinton Push for Increase in Foreign Aid


Witter, Willis, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


TOKYO - The United States yesterday pledged more than $600 million to pay its debts and help replenish the Asian Development Bank's fund for the region's poorest nations.

The U.S. offer, made during two days of meetings of the bank's 25 donor nations, is part of a larger push by the Clinton administration for a modest increase in foreign aid after two years of sharp cutbacks.

Washington's pledge is part of a $6.3 billion package to finance the bank's Asian Development Fund (ADF) for the next four years. The fund makes loans of 30 years or more at 1 percent interest for projects such as roads and bridges to Asia's poorest nations.

Congress must still approve each in a series of payments between now and the year 2000. But the obligation comes at a time when many lawmakers remain opposed to increases in foreign aid.

Mitsuo Sato, president of the Manila-based development bank, said he hoped to persuade skeptical lawmakers that the contribution will not only help poor nations, but also further U.S. interests in the Asia-Pacific region.

Clinton administration officials are using similar arguments in an attempt to wring money from a tight-fisted Congress to clear up debts to the United Nations, World Bank and other international organizations.

President Clinton plans to ask Congress for a $1 billion increase in next year's foreign affairs budget, which includes foreign aid, increasing the total to $19. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Offers $600 Million to Clear Debt to Asian Bank: Offer Part of Clinton Push for Increase in Foreign Aid
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.