Halt Violence over Abortion in Words, Acts

By Washington, Adrienne T. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Halt Violence over Abortion in Words, Acts


Washington, Adrienne T., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


By all accounts, it turns out that "explosion" supposedly in front of the Washington headquarters of Planned Parenthood on the 24th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Roe vs. Wade decision was not an explosion and was one block away on the other side of the street from the abortion clinic.

But there was a "pop heard 'round the world" set off by the rapid, reactionary and incendiary rhetoric to the explosion that never was. And the premature reaction was indeed loud and devastating enough to leave a nuclear holocaust in its aftermath.

Antagonistic words are often more destructive than dynamite. Nowhere is that reality more evident than in this country's deadly quarter-century debate about abortion.

With rank predictability, the media feeding frenzy, the faxing feast, and the rash and reckless charges and countercharges were thrown into full force Wednesday as both sides of the abortion debate jumped up on their perennial soapboxes to create a firestorm from a firecracker.

While the pro-life forces marched and the pro-choice faction power-lunched in this heightened atmosphere of violent actions and vile words, a critical point was still lost to all.

When will the well-intentioned, reasonable folks who feel so strongly about the issues of unborn children or a woman's constitutional right to choose finally come together and fight for what should be their common goal, the need for fewer abortions?

Where's the room for compromise? It's in prevention.

All would agree, I'm sure, that 1.5 million abortions in a single year are far too many. Few pro-choicers are proponents of abortion on demand. Few pro-lifers would object to an abortion to save the life of a mother. Right?

Where's the place to draw the line? It's at violent acts that cause death or injury to those already living.

All would agree, I'm also sure, that it is hypocritical to kill to stop what one deems is killing, and a single bombing and three arsons at clinics are far too many in a single year. Right?

President Clinton may be called the "abortion president" by the pro-life camp because he vetoed the bill prohibiting late-term partial-birth abortions and he imposed stiffer penalties for protests outside abortion clinics. But he's right to say that the public's goal should be to make abortions "safe, legal and rare."

Rare is the operative word here.

Recently, I heard Whoopi Goldberg, of all people, talking a lot of sense to Charlie Rose, the public television talk-show host for people who read and think. The biting feminist comedian smirked and said that she was tired with the shrillness of both groups. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Halt Violence over Abortion in Words, Acts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.