SUNY Binghamton Cancels Two Diversity Courses

By Trotta, Liz | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 12, 1997 | Go to article overview

SUNY Binghamton Cancels Two Diversity Courses


Trotta, Liz, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


NEW YORK - A governing group made up of faculty and students at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Binghamton has voted to abolish two required courses on race and gender scheduled to begin in September.

The proposed courses, "The Nature of Oppression" and "The Social Construction of Inequality," have been a major irritant on campus and led to protest marches, sit-ins and a student takeover of the administration building in October.

The Harper College Council, which governs the university's undergraduate arts and sciences college, voted 21-16 to throw out the courses. The council represents 6,341 students, but the proposed courses would have applied only to incoming students.

The vote was taken last Wednesday, but no apparent effort was made by the school to make it public. The council has 54 members - 29 faculty members, 16 undergraduates, three graduate students and six university administrators.

"Force me to bow down and study `The Nature of Oppression' and I will reach for my long knife,"said John Carney, writing in the Conservative Binghamton Review, a campus newspaper he edits.

Jesse Benjamin, president of the Graduate Students Union and a leading pro-diversity activist, could not be reached for comment. He is quoted in the mainstream campus newspaper Pipe Dream as saying, "With this vote, the right-wing has consolidated its hold on this campus, and the neo-fascist takeover is complete."

"I think this is a change in direction for the university," said Mr. Carney, a political philosophy major in the forefront of those opposed to diversity requirements. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

SUNY Binghamton Cancels Two Diversity Courses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.