World Population Seen Surging: Vast Majority of Births in Third World

By Mbuya, Judith | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 13, 1997 | Go to article overview

World Population Seen Surging: Vast Majority of Births in Third World


Mbuya, Judith, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The population "bomb" - as the explosive growth of the world's population is sometimes referred to - is still ticking and is likely to continue to do so well into the next century.

That's the ominous conclusion drawn by the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), a Washington-based nonprofit educational organization that recently released its latest studies of demographic and socio-economic data and population estimates for countries and regions of the world.

According to the PRB, the world population is growing by nearly 1 billion people every 11 years.

"About 88 million people are added to the population each year," said Alene H. Gelbard, the PRB's director of international programs.

The population projections are cause for concern, particularly when considered against data showing that it took until the early 1800s for the world's population to reach the first billion.

Most of the population increases occur in the Third World, the PRB's data show.

"Ninety-five percent of the growth we are seeing is taking place in developing countries and regions," Miss Gelbard said.

In contrast to fully developed nations, which can most afford an expansion in numbers, the growth is taking place largely in nations where resource scarcities press relentlessly upon the ability of governments and private institutions to cope with providing the bare necessities.

The bureau's statistics show that by the year 2025, if present patterns continue, the world's 5.8 billion people will be joined by more than another 2 billion. The actual number projected by the bureau is 8.1 billion people, which includes 6.9 billion people in less-developed countries.

That's five times more than the projected population growth of the more-developed countries.

But how fast the population is growing is a matter of contention among demographic agencies.

For example, the U.N. Population Division estimated that about 4.59 billion people live in less-developed regions and are growing at an annual rate of 1.8 percent, whereas in the developed world, there are an estimated 1.18 billion people increasing at only 0.4 percent annually.

Another Washington-based population-research group, the Population Institute, recently concluded that global population growth is actually slowing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

World Population Seen Surging: Vast Majority of Births in Third World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.