Animal Rights Movement Thrives on Emotions and Ignorance

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

Animal Rights Movement Thrives on Emotions and Ignorance


The Jan. 5 letter from PETA correspondent Kathy Guillermo ("AIDS research is a poor excuse for animal research") is one more example of the relentless attempt of the animal rights movement to take advantage of the increasing scientific ignorance of most Americans and to substitute obfuscation and emotionalism for sound science. The use of animals in biomedical research to assure that human (and animal) medicines, cosmetics and household products are safe and effective is essential; there can be no substitute save a retreat to ignorance and unnecessary risks. The scientific method, combined with years of conscientious effort by scientists, doctors and technicians - plus the acknowledged sacrifices of laboratory animals - has raised the health and improved the lifestyle of every one of us, including all the animal "rights" activists, who would enjoy the benefits of new cures for old diseases while claiming to be more concerned about an unrealistic - and immoral - ideal of equality for all sentient beasts.

A little digging into the facts would reveal that PETA and its allies spend $50 million to $100 million a year in their campaigns to substitute warm fuzzies for cold facts. There are no figures available to estimate the tremendous increase in the cost of conducting society's important biomedical research: actual costs for heightened security, for instance, to protect laboratories and researchers from violently radical activists and psychic costs for the embattled scientists who are forced to be concerned for their physical, as well as their intellectual, well-being. …

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Animal Rights Movement Thrives on Emotions and Ignorance
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