North Korean Pilot Defects to South: Couldn't Take Austere Conditions

By Witter, Willis | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 24, 1996 | Go to article overview

North Korean Pilot Defects to South: Couldn't Take Austere Conditions


Witter, Willis, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


TOKYO - A North Korean pilot, declaring he could no longer tolerate conditions in the North, flew his aging Soviet-built fighter jet to an airfield south of Seoul in a dramatic defection yesterday.

The first thing he asked for was a glass of whiskey.

Air raid sirens sounded in Seoul and nearby cities as South Korean fighter jets scrambled to intercept the lone defector above the Yellow Sea west of the South Korean capital.

It sparked the first air-raid alert in 13 years and sent millions of South Koreans briefly scrambling for cover in underground shelters.

When the pilot waggled his unarmed jet's wings and lowered his landing gearing signaling he wanted to defect, South Korea's U.S.-made F-16 jets escorted him to an airfield south of Seoul.

"I could not stand to live in the North any more," North Korean Capt. Lee Chul-soo, 30, told reporters after landing.

He said he left behind his father, a wife and two young children.

Television stations in Seoul quoted government officials as saying the defector may receive a reward of up to $320,000.

The defection came hours after South Korea accused the North of crossing into its territory with five gunboats. It was the latest in a series of incidents since early April when Pyongyang announced it was unilaterally abandoning the 1953 truce that ended the Korean War.

The apparently unrelated events ratcheted up tensions on the Korean peninsula even as the North continued to ponder a month-old, U.S.-South Korean peace initiative.

Unlike past peace overtures, the North has remained noncommittal on the proposal by President Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam at a summit last month.

"This is a remarkable thing," said Kim Kyung-won," president of the Seoul-based Institute of Social Sciences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

North Korean Pilot Defects to South: Couldn't Take Austere Conditions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.