Recording Industry Offers Help to Artists with Drug Problems: Music Business Establishes Substance-Abuse Programs

By Billingsley, K. L. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 22, 1996 | Go to article overview

Recording Industry Offers Help to Artists with Drug Problems: Music Business Establishes Substance-Abuse Programs


Billingsley, K. L., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


SANTA MONICA, Calif. - Music-industry insiders have announced plans to deal with the drug abuse long associated with the recording industry, which has been beset of late by drug-related deaths, arrests and concert cancellations.

"Our industry has been in denial for a while, said Michael Greene, president of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, which hosted a press conference here yesterday after a closed-door meeting of industry professionals.

"We have a poor sense of our history," Mr. Greene said. "People are fed up with not having [pioneering jazz saxophonist] Charlie Parker and [guitar virtuoso] Jimi Hendrix around. After two or three deaths in succession, we said, `That's it.' "

On Memorial Day weekend, Bradley Nowell, lead singer of the band Sublime died of a heroin overdose in San Francisco. The same weekend, Depeche Mode singer Dave Gahan was arrested in Los Angeles for investigation of cocaine possession and being under the influence of heroin.

The Stone Temple Pilots were forced to cancel their summer tour this year after a judge in April ordered lead singer Scott Weiland into a treatment program. Mr. Weiland was arrested in Pasadena in 1995 after deputies found crack in his car and heroin in his wallet.

Last October, Shannon Hoon of Blind Melon died of a cocaine overdose. In 1994, Kurt Cobain of the grunge band Nirvana fatally shot himself after a failed suicide attempt in Europe, in which he overdosed on drugs. He struggled for years with heroin and alcohol abuse.

The MusiCares Foundation, founded in 1989, will administer a substance abuse and intervention program. The program can put a performer in touch with caseworkers for drug intervention and financial assistance in patient care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Recording Industry Offers Help to Artists with Drug Problems: Music Business Establishes Substance-Abuse Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.