Myers' Tardiness Doesn't Worry Club

By Loverro, Thom | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 23, 1996 | Go to article overview

Myers' Tardiness Doesn't Worry Club


Loverro, Thom, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The second day of full-squad workouts came and went for the Baltimore Orioles with reliever Randy Myers nowhere to be seen. But club officials remained patient and confident that Myers will be on the field today.

The deadline for reporting to spring training is March 1 under baseball's labor rules, but each club sets its own deadlines earlier and expects players to honor them.

Baltimore's dates were Feb. 15 for pitchers and catchers and Tuesday for position players. But Myers has stayed in Washington state - first because he was helping coach the women's basketball team at Clark College and then because he was helping his mother with flooding problems.

On Wednesday, manager Davey Johnson said he expected his closer to be in camp yesterday. When asked about Myers yesterday, Johnson said, "I'm sure he is in Florida somewhere. I tried to call him [Wednesday], but there was no one there. I'll just wait until he is in uniform. Technically, he's not late until March 1. No use worrying about it, because there's not much I can do."

Myers has a history of reporting late because of his commitment to his basketball coaching. When he was with Cincinnati, then-manager Lou Piniella wasn't pleased. But the Orioles seem determined not to let it affect their efforts to build team chemistry.

"It doesn't bother us," general manager Pat Gillick said. "We know what kind of shape Randy keeps himself in, and it's probably better than most of the guys here now. We know he'll be ready."

Myers, 33, signed a two-year, $6.3 million contract in December after converting 38 of 44 save situations last season for the Chicago Cubs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Myers' Tardiness Doesn't Worry Club
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.